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"Cheating Lessons" and "On The Clock"

Earn a professional development certificate by engaging the ideas presented by James Lang.

On March 25th, 2014, we were visited by Dr. James Lang, a regular columnist for the Chronicle of Higher Education and author of Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty and currently writing On The Clock:Timely (and Fast and Easy) Interventions to Maximize Learning in Any College Classroom. See below for recordings of his presentations.

If you would like to earn a certificate for engaging his ideas, please register. You will be enrolled in a Blackboard organization for this purpose. A current cohort is working on completing this by June 6th, 2014. To earn a certificate you must:

  • Read further about a concept or practice in one of his talks (many links provided) and share a reflection or reaction in an online discussion forum
  • Apply an idea in your work and share your experience in a discussion forum

Presentations

Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty 

 


When students engage in academically dishonest behaviors, they are reacting inappropriately to a learning environment that, for some reason, has not inspired them to learn. Hence if we can view cheating as a failure in the teaching and learning transaction—as well as an ethical problem—and we can gain a better understanding of the reasons for academically dishonest behavior, we can use that knowledge to build better learning environments.  The talk will review current statistics on cheating in higher education, consider the role of the learning environment in influencing student cheating, and argue for the importance of a whole-campus commitment to academic integrity.

On the Clock: Timely (and Fast and Easy) Interventions to Maximize Learning in Any College Classroom 

 

Recent research in cognitive theory seems to be orienting around a small set of principles that can help maximize learning in college and university classrooms.  This research suggests that small, brief interventions can work in almost any type of classroom environment, from standard lectures to studio classes, to help students process, remember, and apply course skills and concepts.  This session will introduce faculty to several key principles from some of today’s top cognitive theorists—including the testing (and pre-testing) effect, self-explanation, desirable difficulties, and dual coding—and encourage them to reflect upon how they might help shape individual class sessions to increase student learning.


James Lang's visit was sponsored by:
Office of Student Conduct, Scholastic Integrity Committee, Student Engagement and Leadership, Office of Academic Affairs Faculty Entry, Training and Professional Development Committee and Human Resources


About James Lang:

James LangJames M. Lang is an Associate Professor of English and the Director of the Center for Teaching Excellence at Assumption College in Worcester, MA. He is the author of four books, the most recent of which are Cheating Lessons: Learning from Academic Dishonesty (Harvard University Press, 2013), and On Course: A Week-by-Week Guide to Your First Semester of College Teaching (Harvard UP, 2008). A starred review in Library Journal describes Cheating Lessons as a “lively book” that “explains relevant cognitive theory, outlines factors that foster cheating, and presents fascinating examples of course structures and classroom activities that stimulate students to work toward mastering their subjects.” Lang writes a monthly column on teaching and learning for The Chronicle of Higher Education; his work has been appearing in the Chronicle since 1999. You can contact James Lang with questions about his presentations at lang@assumption.edu.